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3 posts tagged we get what we intend

Intention

My dad has a saying, “You get what you intend, not what you hope for.” How many things in our lives are we actually intentional about, though? In the creative (and development) world, I consistently see studios grow beyond their optimal size. Our culture rewards it, and often our internal drive is to be bigger because we’re told that bigger is better. But is it?

I haven’t been distracted by pushing a boulder up the wrong hill. I get to focus on doing really great work for excellent clients.

Like Berger & Föhr, I’ve been intentional about operating as a shop of one—I’m a bit of a design and development multi-tool. Some projects I team up with others (like Berger & Föhr) and other projects I handle by myself. I may not be this size forever, but it has been an intentional choice and a lot of rewarding things have come from it. The biggest bonus, though, is simply that I haven’t been distracted by pushing a boulder up the wrong hill. I get to focus on doing really great work for excellent clients. And, contrary to popular belief, my access to bigger and better projects has often come as a result of my practice size, not at the expense of it.

How intentional are you about the size and goals of your business?

3-Way Street

Ron Gabriel put together a video highlighting interactions between cyclists, pedestrians, and motorists at just one of NYC’s over 12k intersections. The results are pretty much what you would expect, but it’s interesting to watch, nonetheless.

He has some more information about the video and project on his blog.

(via @brad)

Skeletal models and super-sized hypocrisy

I don’t usually combine several quotes spread across the same article into one post, but I had trouble deciding what to include this time.

I feel like body image and eating disorders—in this case in relation to the fashion industry—is something we often have in the back of our minds, but we don’t often take the time to stop and think about. Our culture is constantly changing and adjusting, but much of it is not an accident. In many ways we get the culture and taste that we intend.

These issues effect men and women far outside the fashion industry. And fashion is not at all to blame—at least, not in its entirety—but it’s one very visible area of culture that maybe we should start intending or expecting something different from.

(via @chadfowler)